MacDONALD

McDonald , MacDomhnaill, MacDonald, Donaldson

"Windows Into Our Past A Genealogy of the Garton, Smith & Associated Families, Volume 2", compiled by Judy Parsons Smith © 2003

Text Box:  McDonnell - ARMS:  Or, a lion ramp. Gu

The Clan Donald is an intricate part of the history of both Ireland and Scotland .  Members of the Clan Colla left Ulster in early times and settled in Argyle, and the Hebrides in Scotland . The Clan Donald originated in the Highlands of Scotland[i].  Highlanders had the lusty genes of the Viking, were most a home when quarreling with friends, neighbors and foes; they were Old Irish Catholic.  The MacDonnells are conspicuous figure in the history of Scotland .  They were one of the most valiant and powerful clans in Scotland .  The Irish maintained close relationships with the Highland Scots especially the Clan Donald of Kintrye and that part of Scotland nearest Ireland .  Highlanders who moved into Ireland settled in Donegal and the Glens of Antrim.  Here they married Irish women.[ii]  The Ancestry of the Clan Donald can be traced to Godfraidh Mac Fergus , Lord of Hebrides , d. 853.  His lineage continues on to Colla Uais , High King during the 4th Century in Ireland.

Gille Bride[iii]

Gille Bride (Giolla Brighid) , son of Gille Adomanan.  Gille Bride traveled to Ireland to seek help in expelling the Norse from his ancestral lands.  He was the claimant of Argyll[iv]. 

Gille Bride had two (2) sons[v]:

·         Somerled  
·        
Dubhghall, was the King of the  Isles, d. living in 1144.  (Dubhghall is Irish for a black foreigner)  He was the ancestor of the MacDougall, MacDougald, MacDowell and MacDowall families.

Text Box:  

MacDonald Gaelic
Coat of Arms
The Clan Donald

Motto:  Per marze per terra
Translation from Latin:  By lands and by seas

Slogan:  Fraoch Eilian         
Translation from Gaelic:  The Heathery Isle

Plant Badge:  Heather

Clan Pipe Music:  Mort Ghlinne Mnic Ailein

Translation :  Massacre of Glencoe

Somerled MacGillebride

Savarly, Sorley, Samuel , Samhairle  (Alternate spellings of name) [vi]

Somerled MacGillebride , son of Gille Bride , b. abt. 1100[vii]; d. 1164, in a Monastery of Saddle[viii], slain campaigning against Malcolm IV, King of Scotland ; m1st to Sabina ; m2nd ca. 1140 to Ragnhild Olavsdatter[ix], Princess of Mann (only known child) , daughter of  Olaf the Red , King of the Isle of Man, b. ca. 1111[x] .

In 1140, Somerled  was the 8th and greatest Thane of Argyle; lord of Cantyre; lord of Hebrides ; founder of the “Kingdom of the Isles”.[xi]  He expelled the Norwegians from Scotland at the end of the 12th Century.  Somerled invaided the Isle of Man, defeating Godfred and in doing so he came into possession of the Kingdom of the Isles and Man.   He ruled the Southern Isles from 1156[xii].  The expelling of the Norwegians earned Somerled the tiled of Ri Innse Gall - Ruler of the Isle of the Norsemen.  Somerled also held the title of Ri Airir Gaidhed - Ruler of the Coastland of Gael.  His formal name may well have been Somerled, Rex Insularum .  He was described as a well-tempered man, in body shapely, of a fair and piercing eye, of middle stature and of quick discernment. Somerled MacDonnell  was the Thane of Argyle his descendants were allied by intermarriages with the Norwegians, earls of the Orkneys, Hebrides and Isle of Man [xiii].

Text Box:  From an article entitled “Clan MacDonald: MacDonald of the Isles”:

A UNIQUE and important place in Scottish history, and particularly in the history of the Hebrides and the southwestern Highlands , is occupied by the great figure of Somerled of the Isles. "Somerledi," or summer sailors, is said to have been the term applied to the Norwegian adventurers, whose raids upon the coasts of this country were usually made during the pleasanter months of the year; but so far as history is concerned the name is that of the great island lord who reigned as an independent prince of the West and the Isles throughout the middle of the twelfth century. It is generally asserted in the Highland genealogies of to-day that Somerled was a Celtic chief by whose efforts the Norsemen had been driven from the mainland of Scotland, and who had wrested the islands of the west from the Norwegian Olaf, King of Man, before setting himself up as King of the Isles and Lord of Argyll; but the facts of history make it appear more likely that he was himself a Norseman, and we know his wife was Effrica daughter of Olaf of Man. When the High Steward, settled at Renfrew for the purpose by David I. of Scotland, began to drive back the Norse invaders who were then thrusting their settlements into the higher reaches of the Firth of Clyde, his chief opponent was this Somerled of the Isles. The climax of the struggle between them was reached in 1164, when Somerled landed a great force on the shores of Renfrewshire, and fought a pitched battle with the forces of the High Steward near the headquarters of the latter at Renfrew itself. In that battle Somerled fell, along with Gillecolane, his son by his first marriage, and it seems possible that the Barochan Cross , with its interesting and appropriate sculptures, still standing near the scene of the battle, forms a memorial of the event.[xiv]

From an article entitled “Clan MacDonald: The MacDonalds of Glen Coe"

Text Box:  ONE of the wildest and grandest of the glens of Scotland, and at the same time, by reason of its tragic memories, one of the best known, is that which runs westward from the south shore of Loch Leven into the heart of the highest mountains of Argyll. The stream which brawls through its lonely recesses remains famous in Ossianic poetry under the name of Cona, and high in the face of one of its mountain precipices is to be seen the opening of a cavern said by tradition to have been a retreat of the poet Ossian himself. In the twelfth century, along with the Isles and a vast extent of the western mainland of Scotland, Glencoe appears to have been a possession of the great Somerled, Lord of the Isles, from whom it seems to have passed, along with the northern mainland possessions of the great lordship, to his eldest son, Dugal, ancestor of the MacDougals of Lorne and Argyll. In the Wars of Succession at the beginning of the fourteenth century the two great houses descended from Somerled’s sons took opposite sides. While the MacDougals took the side of Baliol and Comyn, the MacDonalds, descended from Somerled’s second son, Reginald , took the side of Bruce , and Angus Og . Reginald ’s great-grandson, having distinguished himself with his clan at Bannockburn , paved the way for his family’s rise again to the position of chief consequence in the West of Scotland . As an immediate reward, Angus Og is said to have obtained from Bruce ’s grandson, King Robert II. , the lands of Morvern, Ardnamurchan, and Lochaber, forfeited by the MacDougals for the part they had taken against Bruce . While Angus Og’s eldest son, John, succeeded as Lord of the Isles, a younger son, lain Fraoch, appears to have settled in Glencoe, to which he further secured the right by marrying a daughter of a certain Dugal MacEanreug. From lain Fraoch this sept of the MacDonalds took its common name of the Maclans of Glencoe, and from the fact that one of its chiefs after the fashion of those early times, was fostered by a family in Lochaber, it frequently received the appellation of Abarach. The race is not to be confused with that of Maclain of Ardnamurchan, which claimed descent from lain Sprangaech, a son, not of Angus Og, but of his father, Angus Mor[xv].

Somerled  and Sabina  had a son:

                Gillecolum , d. 1164 .  Gillecolum had a son:

·         Somerled , d. 1221, defeated & slain by Alexander II .  He inherited Argyll.

Somerled  and Ragnhild  had four (4) children:

1.       Dugal mac Somerled , King in the Isle, Lord of Argyll & Lorn.  He inherited from his father Somerled, Lorne and his more northern possessions and who became ancestor of the MacDougalls of Lorne.  
2.      
Angus  mac Somerled, d. 1210, slain by his nephew Donald & Roderick both sons of Reginald .  .  He held part of Arran and Bute . He obtained the great Lordship of Garmoran, the actual bounds of which are not now certain.
3.       Ranald/Reginald  mac Somerled, b. ca. 1148[xvi], Morven, Argyle, Scottland; d. 1207[xvii], Kinyre, Argyle , Scotland .  obtained Kintyre, Cowal, Isla, Arran, and Bute .  It is from Reginald that the MacDonalds of the Isles and all the branches of the name the descended.  
4.      
Alexander  mac Somerled

Text Box:  

Badge of the Clan MacDonald
Angus  mac Somerled

2.  Angus [xviii] mac Somerled , son of Somerled  and Ragnhild , d. 1210, slain by his nephew Donald & Roderick both sons of Reginald .  Angus was Lord of Bute & Arran. 

Angus mac Somerled had a son:

2.1.  Seuman mac Angus, d. 1210, slain

Ranald/Reginald mac Somerled

3.  Ranald/Reginald mac Somerled, son of Somerled & Ragnhild (Olavsdatter) MacGillebride, b. ca. 1148[xix], Morven, Argyle, Scottland; d. 1207[xx], Kinyre, Argyle, Scotland; m. Fiona Moray[xxi], b. Galloway[xxii] . 

He held the Isby, Kintyre and part of Arran .  Randal mac Somerled  was lord of Oergeal and Cantyre, King ot the Isles and Lord of Argyll and Kintyre from 1164 to 1207.  Randal Mac Somerled , was the founder of the Cisterician Monastery and a benefactor of the Abbey of Paisley.  He succeded his father in about 1164 as 2nd Lord of the Isles and served as such until his death.

Ranald & Fiona (Moray[xxiii]) macSomerled had seven (7) children:

1.1.   Donald (Domhnall) of Clan Donald, b. abt. 1190; d. 1249.  He was 3rd Lord of the Isles.  
1.2. 
Roderick (Ruari) mac Ranald,  founder the Clan Ruaire (MacRories of Bute), he got Bute, Arran , and Garmoran. It is probably he who figures in the legend of Rothesay Castle enshrined in the ballad of "The Bluidy Stair." We know at any rate that the struggle for the possession of Bute and its stronghold went on between the Stewarts and the descendants of Somerled with varying fortunes till about the time of the battle of Largs in 1263. The last of the line of Roderick or Ruari, was Amy , the first wife of John , Chief of Clan Donald and Lord of the Isles.
1.3. 
Dogall of the Isles[xxiv]
1.4. 
daughter mac Ranald, m. Hugh O’Connor  
1.5. 
Aongus (or Æneas) mac Ranald, living in 1211
1.6. 
Alexander mac Ranald, ancestor of the MacDonnell of Ulster
1.7. 
Rory mac Ranald, ancestor of the MacRory (later - Rogers and Rodgers )

Donald of the Isles

3.1.  Donald (Domhnall) of the Isles , son of Ranald/Reginald mac Somerled, b. ca. 1190[xxv]; d. 1249[xxvi]

His name translates “domhan” Irish for the world; “all” meaning mighty. Donald is the founder of the Clan Donald. 

The Clan Donald derive their origin from Donald of Reginald, who appears to have inherited South Kintyre, and the island of Islay; but little is known of their history until the annexation of the Isles to the Crown in the year 1266. The Clan Donald were lords of the Hebrides, and of Cantyre, and other areas in Scotland.  They were the chiefs of Glencoe.  He held isles of Kintyre, Morvern, Ardanmurchan and Islay.  According to Highland tradition, Donald made a pilgrimage to Rome to do penance, and obtain absolution for the various enormities of his former life; and, on his return, evinced his gratitude and piety by making grants of land to the monastery of Saddel, and other religious houses in Scotland[xxvii].

Donald & Margaret (Stuart) of  the Isles had:

3.1.1.         Aongus (or Æneas) Mór MacDonald, b. ca. 1249; d. 1301
3.1.2.        
Alexander (or Alustrum/Alastair Mor)  MacDonnell   Ancestor of the Alexander , MacAllister, Saunders, etc families.

Donald, of Clan Donald had:

3.1.3.         Angus  Og MacDonnell 

Seumas mac Angus

2.1.  Seuman mac Angus , son of Angus , d. 1210, slain. 

Seuman mac Angus had a daughter:

2.1.1.  Jean  Macrory

Aongus (or Æneas) Mór MacDonald

3.1.1.  Angus  (or Æneas) Mór MacDonald, son of Donald of the Isles, m. Miss Campbell, b. ca. 1249[xxviii]; d. 1301; m. Miss Campbell.

Aongus Mór MacDonnell  was the 4th Lord of the Isles and 1st MacDonald.

In February, 1256 King Henry III of England commanded his baliffs and subject in Ireland not allow Angus Mor MacDonnell, or other Scottish male factors to be received in Ireland, and again in 1260 admittance to that country was denied to the Scots[xxix].

Donald was succeeded by his son, Angus  Mor, who, on the arrival of Haco with his fleet, immediately joined the Norwegian king, and assisted him during the whole of the expedition; yet, when a treaty of peace was afterwards concluded between the kings of Norway and Scotland, he does not appear to have suffered in consequence of the part which he took in that enterprise. In the year 1284 he appeared at the convention, by which the Maid of Norway was declared heiress of the crown, and obtained as the price of his support on that occasion a grant of Ardnamurchan, a part of the earldom of Garmoran1, and the confirmation of his father's and grandfather's grants to the monastery of Saddel. Angus left two sons, Alexander  and Angus Og (ie, the younger) [xxx].

Aongus Mór & Miss ( Campbell ) MacDonnell  had:

3.1.1.1.     Alexander (Alastair Og) MacDonnell , b. 1272[xxxi]; d. 1296, slain at Dindonald Castle; m. Margaret O’Cathan[xxxii].  He was the ancestor of the MacDonnells, the “Gallowglasses of Ulster”.  He was imprisoned by Robert Bruce in Dindonald Castle where he died. 5th Lord of the Isles.
3.1.1.2.   
Angus (Æneas) Oge MacDonnell, b. ca. 1275; m. Agnes O’Cahan.
3.1.1.3.   
Iain (John) Sprangach ‘the Bold’ MacDonnell aka MacIain of Ardnamurchan.

Aongus MacDonald had two other natural sons:

3.1.1.4.     Eoin, “The Gnieve” MacDonnell .

Jean Macrory

2.1.1.  Jean Macrory[xxxiii], daughter of Seumas mac Angus, m. Alexander Stewart , d. 1283 .  Co-Regent in 1255. 

Alexander & Jean  (MacDonnell) Steward of Scotland had a son:

·         James [Seumas] Steward of Scotland.  For Further Information See Stewart

Alastair (Alexander)  MacDonnell

3.1.1.1.  Alastair (Alexander)  MacDonnell, son of Aongus Mór & Miss (Campbell) MacDonnell, b. 1272[xxxiv]; d. 1308, slain at Dindonald Castle; m. Margaret O’Cathan[xxxv],  daughter of Ewen of Ergadia[xxxvi].

He was the ancestor of the MacDonnells, the “Gallowglasses of Ulster”.  He was imprisoned by Robert Bruce in Dindonald Castle where he died. 5th Lord of the Isles.

Alexander , by a marriage with one of the daughters of Ewen of Ergadia, acquired a considerable addition to his possessions; but having joined the Lord of Lorn in his opposition to the claims of Robert Bruce, he became involved in the ruin of that chief; and being obliged to surrender to the king, he was imprisoned in Dundonald Castle, where he died. His whole possessions were forfeited, and given to his brother, Angus  Og, who, having attached himself to the party of Bruce, and remained faithful in the hour of adversity, now received the reward of his fidelity and devotion[xxxvii].

Alastarir Og MacDonnell became the pro

Alastair & Margaret (O’Cathan) MacDonnell had a son:

3.1.1.1.1.            Somerled (Sorley) MacDonnell[xxxviii], d. 1387; m. to Miss O’Reilly  For Further Information See MacDonald of Ireland.
3.1.1.1.2.          
Black John MacDonnell.  He had a son, Somerled of Tyrone, who is frequently confused with his uncle Somerled (Sorley) MacDonnell[xxxix].

It is here that there seems to be a differing of the opinions and facts presented by many.  Pursuant to my first volume in which I followed the path set forth by Mr. O’Hart regarding the ancestry of Alexander MacDonnell, father of Bryan MacDonnell (11 Nov [xl]1645).  The ancestry pursuant to the original information is shown on the left and that which has been resently located on the right.  It is my belief that the proposed new lineage is in fact correct and the ancestry of Alexander McDonnell is in fact the family that was living in Leinster/Wicklow Ireland for quite some time.  It may have be a “romanticized” notion that the family had made a harrowing escape from Glencoe in 1692, but more than likely it wasn’t that at all.  The family appears to have been well settled in Ireland for at least eight (8) generations.  I have included the family information for both lines in order that the reader my also have the opportunity to decide for themselves. - JPS

 

From Volume One/O’Hart

3.1.1. 3.1.1.  Angus Mor MacDonnell
3.1.1.2.  Eion Mor MacDonnell
3.1.1.2.3.  Eion Og MacDonnell
2.  Marcus MacDonald
2.1. Tirlough Mor MacDonnell, d. 1435
2.1.1. Tirlough Oge MacDonnell (1st Leinster)
Donoch MacDonnell
Eion Garrach MacDonnell
Eion Garrach MacDonnell II (See McDonald’s of Ireland)
1.1.1. Calbhach MacDonnell, living 1569
1.1.1.1. Hugh Buidhe MacDonnell
1.1.1.1.2.  Bryan MacCalvagh McDonnell
1.1.1.1.2.1.  Alexander McDonnell, b. 1692

 

(Same in both lineages)
(Same in both lineages)

McDonald of Ireland à

 

 

(Same in both lineages)
(Same in both lineages)
(Same in both lineages)
(Same in both lineages)

Proposed New Lineage

3.1.1. Angus Mor MacDonnell
3.1.1.1.  Alastair MacDonnell
3.1.1.1.1.  Somerled (Sorley) MacDonnell (See McDonald’s of Ireland)
Marcus MacDonald (Leinster)  
Charles Thurlough  MacDonnell
John Carrogh MacDonnell
Charles Og MacDonnell
1.  John MacDonald
1.1.  Charles Thurlough MacDonald
1.1.1.  Calvaugh MacDonnell
1.1.1.1. Hugh Buidhe MacDonnell
1.1.1.1.2. Bryan MacCalvagh McDonnell
1.1.1.1.2.1. Alexander McDonnell

Angus (Æneas) Oge MacDonnell

3.1.1.2.  Angus (Æneas) Oge MacDonnell, son of Aongus Mór & Miss (Campbell) MacDonnell, b. ca. 1275; m. to Agnes O’Cahan .

Æneas Oge MacDonnell was lord of the Isles.  He fought at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 on the side of Robert Bruce, King of Scotland[xli].

Donald’s son was known as Angus Mor, and his son again as Angus Og. The latter took Bruce’s side in the War of Succession, and it is he who figures as the hero, accordingly, in Sir Walter Scott’s last great poem, The Lord of the Isles. As a matter of history, recorded by Archdeacon Barbour in his Bruce, Angus Og received and sheltered Bruce in his stronghold of Dunaverty at the south end of Kintyre, when the king was on his way southward in 1306, to shelter in the Island of Rachryn. From the chronicler’s method of telling the tale it does not appear as if Bruce felt himself perfectly safe while enjoying that hospitality. In the following Spring, however, it was with the help of Christina of the Isles that Bruce organised his expedition for the return to Scotland. The historian Tytler, quoting the chronicler Fordoun, describes how a chief named Donald of the Isles raised the men of Galloway against Bruce in 1308, and was defeated and taken prisoner on the banks of the Dee on 29th June by the king’s brother. But Fordoun seems to have confounded the Islesman with some lieutenant of MacDougal of Lorne. As a result of his support of Bruce, Angus Og received, as additions to his territories, Morvern, Ardnamurchan, and Lochaber, which had previously belonged to the MacDougals, but had been forfeited because of that family’s siding with the Comyns against the King[xlii].

Alexander  MacDonnell  had his whole possessions were forfeited, and given to his brother, Angus  Og, who, having attached himself to the party of Bruce, and remained faithful in the hour of adversity, now received the reward of his fidelity and devotion[xliii].

Angus  assisted in the attack upon Carrick, when the king recovered "his father's hall;" and he was present at Bannockburn , where, at the head of his clan, he formed the reserve, and did battle "stalwart and stout," on that never-to- be-forgotten day. Bruce, having at length reaped the reward of all his toils and dangers, and secured the independence of Scotland, was not unmindful of those who had participated in the struggle thus victoriously consummated. Accordingly, he bestowed upon Angus the lordship of Lochaber, which had belonged to the Comyns, together with the lands of Durrour and Glencoe, and the islands of Mull , Tyree, &c., which had formed part of the possessions of the family of Lorn. Prudence might have restrained the royal bounty. The family of the Isles were already too powerful for subjects; but the king, secure of the attachment and fidelity of Angus , contented himself with making the permission to erect a castle or fort at Tarbat in Kintyre, a condition of the grants which he had made. This distinguished chief died early in the fourteenth century, leaving two sons, John his successor, and John Og, the ancestor of the Macdonalds of Glencoe[xliv]

Angus Mór & Agnes (O’Cahan[xlv]) MacDonnell had:

3.1.1.2.1.           John MacDonnell[xlvi], Lord of the Isles, d. 1380; m. Amie MacRuaire  
3.1.1.2.2.          
Randal (or Reginald) MacDonnell, d. 1346, slain at Perth by the Earl of Ross .   
3.1.1.2.3.          
John Og (Iain Fraoch) MacDonald  (natural son); m. Dugal MacEanreug.  He was the founder of the MacIans of Glencoe.

Randal (or Reginald) MacDonnell [xlvii]

3.1.1.1.2.  Randal (or Reginald) MacDonnell , son of Angus Mór MacDonnell.  Randal MacDonnell  had a son:

Shane MacDonnell [xlviii]

3.1.1.1.2.1.  Shane MacDonnell , son of Randal MacDonnell .   Shane MacDonnell had three (3) children:

·         Eoin Mór MacDonnell  
·        
Marcach MacDonnell , d. 1397, slain.
·        
Donal MacDonnell

John, Lord of the Isles [xlix] MacDonnell

3.1.1.2.1.  John Lord of the Isles, of Clan Donald, son of Angus Og MacDonnell  of Islay , b. ca. 1326; d. 1387; m 1st ca. 1354 to Amie MacRuaire, daughter of Ranald MacRuaire , Lord of Garmoran , heiress of Clan Ruaire, of Glengarry; divorced Amie and m2nd 14 Jun 1350 to Margaret Stuart  of Scotland , daughter of King Robert  II & Elizabeth Mure, d. 1387[l].

John divorced Amie in order to marry Margaret MacDonnell .  With his marriage to Amie, John was able to bring under the control of the Clan Donald the lands of the Clan Ruairi.  He became the ancestor of the chieftains of the Clann Raghnail or Clanronald.  John MacDonnell  was the lord of the Isles and High Chief of Clan Donald from 1354.  He was also known as Good John of Islay .  At the time of his death, he controlled Argyle and the whole of the Hebrides from Lewis to Islay, with the exception of Skye.

John & Amie (MacRuaire) MacDonnell  had three (3) children:

3.1.1.1.1.1.  John MacDonnell , d. predeceased father
3.1.1.1.1.2.  Godfrey MacDonnell  
3.1.1.1.1.3.  Ranald MacDonnell , d. predeceased father – ancestor of Glengarry and Clanranald.

John Margaret (Stuart) MacDonnell   had eight (8) children[li]:

3.1.1.1.1.4.      Donal na Heile  (or Donald)  eile” Irish meaning “prayer, adoration” MacDonnell, d. 1423.  Lord of the Isles 1387 to 1423; m. Margaret , daughter of Euphemia, Countess of Ross, in her own right.
3.1.1.1.1.5.     
John Ian Mor Tanistier[lii] (Eoin Oge) MacDonnell, m. Margery Bissett, of the Glinns of Antrim, daughter of Lord  Bissett  of the Glinns of Antrim .  Earl of Antrim.
3.1.1.1.1.6.     
Alexander  Alastair Carrach MacDonald[liii], m. to Margaret Stewart , daughter of King Robert II of Scotland , ancestor of MacDonalds of Keppach.
3.1.1.1.1.7.     
Angus MacDonald[liv]
3.1.1.1.1.8.     
Hugh of Glentilt MacDonald[lv], Thane of Glentilt
3.1.1.1.1.9.     
Marcus MacDonald[lvi]
3.1.1.1.1.10.  
Elizabeth (Margaret) MacDonald , m. Angus Mackay Duff of Strathnaver[lvii]  
3.1.1.1.1.11.   Mary MacDonald , m. Lachlan  MacLean  of Dowart

John Og ( Iain Fraoch ) MacDonald

1.1.1.3. John Og ( Iain Fraoch ) MacDonald, natural son of Angus Mór MacDonnell ; m. Dugal MacEanreug.  He was the founder of the MacIans of Glencoe

Text Box:  While the heads of the great house of MacDonald, the four successive Lords of the Isles, themselves, by their successive marriages and revolts engaged in undertakings which again and again threatened the stability of the Scottish throne itself, the chieftains of the lesser tribes of the name, like Maclain of Glencoe and Maclain of Ardnamurchan, showed a disposition to engage in lawless warlike undertakings which were only less dangerous because indulged in on a smaller scale. In the days of James VI. Maclain of Ardnamurchan bade open defiance to the powers of law and order, and, breaking out into actual piracy, became a terror to much of the west coast of Scotland. The story is told of him that on his plundering excursions, which took him up the narrow waters of Loch Linnhe, he followed the device of painting one side of his galley white and the other black, so that those who noticed him sailing up the loch to plunder and burn should not recognise him and waylay him as he sailed down the loch again with his spoils on board.

Though the Maclans of Glencoe disavowed any connexion with these piratical expeditions of their kinsmen, it is to be feared their own record was not less open to question. As time went on, and the virile house of Campbell rose more and more into power at the expense of their older rivals the MacDonalds, these Maclans of Glencoe played their own part in that struggle of Montagues and Capulets. The struggle came to a height in the seventeenth century, when the Campbells at last felt themselves strong enough to deal their MacDonald rivals a knockout blow. In the time of the civil wars of Charles I., when that King’s general, the Marquess of Montrose, had been defeated at Philiphaugh, and the Marquess of Argyll, Chief of the Campbells, found himself at the head of the government of Scotland and in possession of despotic power, the latter seized the opportunity to send the armies of the Covenant to demolish the last strongholds of the MacDonalds and MacDougals, burning the forts of the latter at Gylen and Dunnollie near Oban, and massacring the garrison of three hundred MacDonalds in their Castle of Dunavertie at the south end of Kintyre.  

Glencoe is located in a Valley of W Scotland, SE of Loch Leven.  In 1692,  the Massacre of the McDonald clan by the Campbell’s at Glencoe, Scotland began years of highland feuding. The Highland Chiefs were required by King William III  of England to swear an oath of submission to his rule by January 1, 16 92, failure to do so would result in death.

The story of the betrayal of the McDonald Clan:

Trying to reach Fort William (on January 1, 16 92) to make his submission to the government before the time ran out, was hindered by wild weather (blizzard) and arrived  late. Having requested and extension they were lulled into false security at their request.  This clan gave hospitality to a detachment of  Campbell troops under Campbell of Glenn Lyon.

 

Having failed to make his submission to the government, the following orders were issued[lviii]:

 

“To Captain Robert Campbell .

 

“Thou art hereby commanded to seize the rebels, the Clan M’Donald of Glencoe, and slay every soul of them under three score years and ten.  Thou shalt take special care that the Old Fox and sons do not make their escape.  Begin they work sharp at five o’clock to-morrow morning.  I will endeavor to be forward with a strong force at that hour.  If I am not there, delay not a moment, but begin at the hour specified.  The forgoing is the King’s special command.  See that thou yield implicit obedience.  If not, thou art considered unfaithgul to thy trust, and unworthy of holding a commission in his service. – I am, ROBERT DUNCANSON . __ Ballachaolish, 2nd mo. 1692.”

 

After being billeted on the clan for a fortnight (14days) on the  snowy morning of 13 February, 1692 they turned on their hosts and slew all they could lay hands upon.  At a later official inquiry, the plot was laid at the door of the master of stair.

Donald (Donal na Heile)

3.1.1.1.1.4.  Donald (Donal na Heile   eile” Irish meaning “prayer, adoration”) MacDonnell, son of John MacDonnell & Margaret , d. 1423; m. Margaret , daughter of Euphemia, Countess of Ross, in her own right.  Lord of the Isles 1387 to 1423.

Donald, Lord of the Isles & Margaret of Ross had:

3.1.1.1.1.4.1.  Alexander MacDonald, d. ca. 1477

Alexander MacDonald

3.1.1.1.1.4.1.  Alexander MacDonald, son of Donald, Lord of the Isles & Margaret of Ross, d. ca. 1477.  

Alexander MacDonald had three (3) sons:

·         John  
·        
Hugh  
·        
Celestine

John Ian Mor Tanistier (Eion Og)  MacDonnell[lix]

3.1.1.1.1.5.  John Ian Mor Tanistier (Eion Og)  MacDonnell, 2nd son of Eion Mór MacDonnell  & Margaret, b. 1358-1385[lx]; d. 1427, assissinated, m. Marjorie ‘Margery’ Bissett, daughter of Sir Hugh Bisset, Lord  Bissett , of the Glinns of Antrim.  From Eion Og/Iain the Tanist the ‘Clan Donald South’: the Macdonalds of Islay and Kintyre; progenitor of MacIans or MacDonalds of Glencoe; and present day McDonnel earls of Antrim.  It is said that he is the Hero of Sir Walter Scott’s “Lord of The Isles”

Eion Og & Marjorie (Bissett) MacDonnell  had:

1.       Donal Ballach MacDonnell , m. Joan, daughter of O’Donnell , lord of Tirconnell  
2.      
Marcus (or Mark) MacDonnell , ancestor of the MacDonnell of Leinster. (An alternate theory gives Somerled (Sorley) MacDonnell as his father)

Donal Ballach MacDonnell

1.  Donal Ballach MacDonnell , son of Eoin MacDonnell, m. Joan, daughter of O’Donnell , lord of Tirconnell . 

Donal Ballach & Joan (O’Donnell) MacDonnell  had a son:

1.1.   Eoin Mac Donnell

Marcus (or Mark) MacDonnell [lxi]

2.  Marcus (or Mark )MacDonnell, son of Eoin MacDonnell , b. 1381-1396[lxii]; d. ca. 1397[lxiii]. (An alternate theory gives Somerled (Sorley) MacDonnell as his father), m. a daughter of O’Cahan (or daughter of Oheyan Lord of Dunsevem[lxiv]) .  Marcus & daughter of O’Cahan had a son:

                2.1.  Tirlogh Mòr MacDonell (He may be the same as Charles Thurlough MacDonnell of Ireland ), b. 1393-1398[lxv]

Eoin MacDonnell

1.1.  Eoin MacDonnell , son of Donal Ballach & Joan ( O’Donnell ) MacDonnell , m. Sarah O’Neill , daughter of Phelim   O’Neill , lord of the Clanaboys.  Eoin & Sarah (O’Neill) MacDonnell  had a son:

                1.1.1.  Eoin Cathanach MacDonnell

Tirlogh Mór MacDonnell[lxvi]

2.1.  Tirlogh Mór MacDonnell of the Glinns[lxvii] (or Charles Thurlough MacDonnell), son of Marcus MacDonnell , b. 1393-1398[lxviii]; d. 1435.   Tirlogh Mòr MacDonnell had a son:

                2.1.1.  Tirlogh Oge MacDonnell (he may be the same as John Carrogh MacDonnell of Ireland), b. 1357-1435[lxix].

Eion Cathanach MacDonnell

1.1.1.  Eoin Cathanach MacDonnell , son of Eoin & Sarah (O’Neill) MacDonnell , d. 1499, hanged; m. Cecilia Savage , daughter of Robert Savage , of Ards. 

Eoin Cathanach & Cecilia (Savage) MacDonnell  had a son:

1.1.1.1.      Alexander  MacDonnell , m. Catherine MacCahlan , daughter of Murcha  MacCahlan  of Derry.
1.1.1.2.     
Æneas MacDonnell  -  he was called “MacParsons”.  See Parsons, Vol. 1.

Tirlogh Oge MacDonnell [lxx]

2.1.1.  Tirlogh Oge MacDonnell , son of Tirlogh Mór MacDonnell, b. 1357-1435[lxxi]. He was the first of the family to settle in Leinster.  There were three families of MacDonnells in Leinster.  Two of the families resided in Queen’s County, the third in the present day town of Talbotstown, county of Wicklow.Tirlogh Oge had a son:

Donoch MacDonnell[lxxii]

Donoch MacDonnell, son of Tirlogh Oge MacDonnell, b. 1390[lxxiii]-1442, Leinster, Ireland; d. 1504[lxxiv], slain in Leix. (He may be the same as Charles Og McDonald of Ireland) , had:

Eoin Garrach MacDonnell [lxxv]

Eoin Garrach MacDonnell , son of Donoch MacDonnell, b. 1417-1471[lxxvi], Leinster, County Wicklow, Ireland[lxxvii]. (He may be the same as John McDonald of Ireland) had:

Eion Garrach MacDonnell II[lxxviii]

Eion Garrach MacDonnell II[lxxix] , son of Eoin Garrach MacDonnell , b. 1455-1498[lxxx].  He had (He may be the same as Charles Thurlough MacDonald of Ireland) had:

Calbhach (Charles) MacDonnell [lxxxi]

Calbhach/Claugh[lxxxii] (Charles) MacDonnell , son of Eion Garrach MacDonnell II, d. Jun 1570[lxxxiii]. (He is the same as Calvagh MacThurough McDonald of Ireland).  The name Calbhach means bald.  He had number of children, all of which are not known by the author at this time (11/95):

·         Hugh Buidhe MacDonnell, m. Mary  Moore.  For Further Information See Hugh Buidhe McDonnell – McDonald’s of Ireland.
·        
Brian MacDonnell
·        
Alexander MacDonnell, d. 1577, slain.

Additional Families To Further Explain This Line

The following families are supplied as additional information to expand the ancestry of the McDonnell family based on the premise that Alexander McDonnell descended from John, Lord of the Isles and Marjorie Stuart.  It appears based on the new information in on the family of McDonald in Ireland that the conclusion that they decended from this line is incorrect. – JPS.


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[ii]
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[iv]
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[v]
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[vii]
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[viii]
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[xii]
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[xiii]
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[xiv]
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[xv]
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[xvi]
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[xvii]
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[xviii]
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[xix]
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[xxii]
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[xxiii]
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[xxiv]
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[xxv]
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[xxix]
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[xxx]
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[xxxi]
http://www.irishmidlandsancestry.com/content/family_history/families/macdonnell_family.htm Irish Midland History site compiled by the Family History Centre Bury Quay, Tullamore Co. Offaly, Ireland e-mail: ohas@iol.ie
[xxxii]
http://www.irishmidlandsancestry.com/content/family_history/families/macdonnell_family.htm Irish Midland History site compiled by the Family History Centre Bury Quay, Tullamore Co. Offaly, Ireland e-mail: ohas@iol.ie
[xxxiii]
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[xxxiv]
http://www.irishmidlandsancestry.com/content/family_history/families/macdonnell_family.htm Irish Midland History site compiled by the Family History Centre Bury Quay, Tullamore Co. Offaly, Ireland e-mail: ohas@iol.ie
[xxxv]
http://www.irishmidlandsancestry.com/content/family_history/families/macdonnell_family.htm Irish Midland History site compiled by the Family History Centre Bury Quay, Tullamore Co. Offaly, Ireland e-mail: ohas@iol.ie
[xxxvi]
http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/m/macdonald/don.html
[xxxvii]
http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/m/macdonald/don.html
[xxxviii]
http://www.irishmidlandsancestry.com/content/family_history/families/macdonnell_family.htm Irish Midland History site compiled by the Family History Centre Bury Quay, Tullamore Co. Offaly, Ireland e-mail: ohas@iol.ie
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[xl]
http://www.irishmidlandsancestry.com/content/family_history/families/macdonnell_family.htm Irish Midland History site compiled by the Family History Centre Bury Quay, Tullamore Co. Offaly, Ireland e-mail: ohas@iol.ie  
[xli]
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[xlii]
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[xliii]
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[xliv]
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[xlv]
http://www.irishmidlandsancestry.com/content/family_history/families/macdonnell_family.htm Irish Midland History site compiled by the Family History Centre Bury Quay, Tullamore Co. Offaly, Ireland e-mail: ohas@iol.ie
[xlvi]
http://www.irishmidlandsancestry.com/content/family_history/families/macdonnell_family.htm Irish Midland History site compiled by the Family History Centre Bury Quay, Tullamore Co. Offaly, Ireland e-mail: ohas@iol.ie
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[xlviii]
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[xlix]
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[l]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[li]
Version: 7 Apr 2003 © 1994-2003 Brian Tompsett refernces listed at http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/royal/reference.txt
[lii]
Version: 7 Apr 2003 © 1994-2003 Brian Tompsett refernces listed at http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/royal/reference.txt
[liii]
Version: 7 Apr 2003 © 1994-2003 Brian Tompsett refernces listed at http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/royal/reference.txt
[liv]
Version: 7 Apr 2003 © 1994-2003 Brian Tompsett refernces listed at http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/royal/reference.txt
[lv]
Version: 7 Apr 2003 © 1994-2003 Brian Tompsett refernces listed at http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/royal/reference.txt
[lvi]
Version: 7 Apr 2003 © 1994-2003 Brian Tompsett refernces listed at http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/royal/reference.txt
[lvii]
Version: 7 Apr 2003 © 1994-2003 Brian Tompsett refernces listed at http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/royal/reference.txt
[lviii]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 668  
[lix]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 529, 535  
[lx]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxi]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 529, 535  
[lxii]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxiii]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxiv]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxv]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxvi]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 535  
[lxvii]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxviii]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxix]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxx]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 535  
[lxxi]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxxii]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 535  
[lxxiii]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxxiv]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxxv]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 535  
[lxxvi]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxxvii]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxxviii] “Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 534  
[lxxix]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxxx]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxxxi]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 535  
[lxxxii]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996
[lxxxiii]
WFT Vol 4 tree #3996