VOLUME 5

A Genealogy of the Garton, Smith & Associated Families

My journey into the families within the pages of this volume began innocently enough.  It was my desire to set down the ancestry of my husband for our children.  That simple goal has however, turned into a true expedition through the pages of history.  Let me briefly introduce you to several of the more colorful characters that you will find amongst the pages of this volume.  They are Capt. William Garton , William Mabe ; Col. Martin Van Buren Mabe and his housekeeper, Nancy Jane Mabe ; and Stephen Hopkins .

Capt. William Garton  was a planter, residing in Lancaster County , Virginia on land bought in 1673.  He also ran a coastal shipping business with his brother-in-law, Uriah Angell [i]. His children Uriah & Margaret went on to marry and have children that eventually produced cousins who married thus bring the family together once again.  His descendant Thomas Garton  served during the Revolutionary War[ii], and John Henry Garton served during the Civil War.

We find in England one William Mabe , a man of humble beginnings.  He is found at trial in Hereford , England for the theft of a pair of boots.  He being found guilty is sentenced to seven years indenture in the Virginia Colonies.  Later in the course of events we find him receiving a land grant for 204 acres in Hanover , Virginia .

Colonel Martin Van Buren Mabe and Nancy Jane Mabe , his housekeeper, is enclosed by a wrought iron fence, still erect though covered with vines. Two large finely carved tombstones and six tall pines mark the gravesite, which contains the remains and all the worldly possessions (which could be interred) of its inhabitants. contents of the Mabe tomb sprung f As time passed the colonel prospered, acquiring a sizable estate in goods and property. rom vindictive reasons as shown in the story of their lives.  He is said to have helped widows obtain pensions after the war and was instrumental in getting mail routes started.  When a neighboring man and wife died - leaving their children homeless. The colonel and Nancy Jane took in one of the girls to live with them. Neighbors began gossiping. Spreading slanderous rumor that the colonel and his housekeeper.  Some of the older ones eventually swore out a warrant for the colonel and Nancy Jane , charging them with a crime.   trial they were exonerated.  The neibors unsatisfied once again pursued them before a grand jury, and the second set of charges were once again dismissed.  , the complaints of neighbors were so vicious the colonel and Mary Jane finally gave up their efforts to keep the child. Outraged and humiliated by their neighbors' actions, they withdrew as much as possible from society, although they reportedly helped the child financially even after she left their custody.  Bitter and resentful, Nancy Jane vowed that none of her neighbors and kinsmen would have any of her property when she died. She decided to have all her earthly possessions buried with her. he colonel promised to carry out her wishes and on March 30, 19 16, following her death, he supervised the burial.

Our most colorful character of all seems to be Stephen Hopkins .  He indeed lived a most full and adventurous life.  Coming from England he was shipwrecked in Bermuda .  There he incited a mutiny against the governor.  He was sentenced to death, yet was spared on behalf of his wife & children.  His travels took him onto the Jamestown Colony and then back to England .  The antics of Stephen Hopkins during the time he spent shipwrecked in Bermuda did not go unnoticed, it seems to have become the inspiration for William Shakespeare ’s, “The Tempest”, and the subplot of the drunken Stephano was based upon him.  His previous perils did not deter him from further travel, in fact, we finding him traveling once more this time together with his wife & children aboard the Mayflower to the Plymouth Colony.  Even there he earned some notoriety by having the occasional brush with the law. 

These families all join together to provide us with a window into our own past.  Looking over the various families we find a such wide and contradictory assortment of both events and characteristics that it does seem hard to believe that they all do eventually mesh together.  These families have ties to the Jamestown Colony, the Mayflower and settlement of the Plymouth Colony, and the early settlement of the Virginia wilderness.  All the facts and recollections are not always honorable nor or they dishonorable.  The people and events that shaped their lives in some small way have been handed down to us through our parents and grandparents, thus touching even us today. Perhaps instilling in us the spirit of adventure and our own exploration.  

So by mixing in: one mutiny; the theft of a pair of boots; drunkenness; fleeing from taxes; a sentence of death; the Mayflower; Plymouth Colony; militia members; Jamestown Colony; Revolutionaries; church Elders; colonist; explorers; circuit riding preachers; and various community leaders…we find that these element and more all combine to weave a rich tapestry that is our heritage.

Mayflower Passengers:

Stephen Hopkins
Constance Hopkins 
Francis Cooke  
Elizabeth Hopkins 
Damaris Hopkins
Giles Hopkins
Oceanus Hopkins

Revolutionary War Service:

William Anderson
James
Doty
Thomas Garton
Tisdale Hodges
Joseph Hopkins 
Robertt Mabe , Sr. 
John William Mabe , Senr.
John Paisley 
William Pinegar
Edward Edmond Smyth
Hannah Cole
Martin Gambill  
Uriah Garton
Elijah Hopkins
Moses Amos Lawson
Samuel McClure
Jonathon Osborn
Mathias Pinegar
Henry Senter
Edward Walthall 
Miles Cook
Uriah Garton , Jr.
David Godfrey
Johnathan Hopkins
William Lloyd
Bryan McDonald , Jr.
William Paisley
Peter Pinegar , Jr.
Peter
Smith ( Pieter Schmidt )
Jarrett Walthall

Civil War Service:

Willis Anders
Spotswood F. Garton
James Hezekiah Pasley 
Richard Smith 
David Garton
Col. Martin Van Buren Mabe (CSA) 
John Calvin Paisley (CSA)
John Henry Garton
Isaac Pasley
Nicholas Smith 

Ministers/Pastors:

Mark Andrews
Rev. Wilborn Cole
(Methodist) 
Rev. Drury Senter
Rev. William Senter
Ericus Tobias Bjork 
Nicholas Gentry (Baptist) 
Rev. Nathaniel McClure
Rev. Joshua Cole (Methodist Minister)
Rev. John Gooch
Rev. Stephen Senter

[Volume 5 Families]


[i] The Garton Genealogy, compiled by Harold E “Pete” Remster, p. 1 citing The Garton News
[ii]
The Garton News Vo. XIV, No. 3, p. 33


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